Programs & Services

Drawn to the Land: Peter Hurd’s New Mexico

The skies. The light. The rolling hills. The people.

The Dry River, 1938, Egg tempura on panel . Courtesy: NM Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum.

An exhibition at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces captures the essence of one of our state’s great artists — Peter Hurd.

Drawn to the Land: Peter Hurd’s New Mexico features 24 paintings and some of the artist’s belongings, including one of his palettes, a pair of chaps, sombrero, guitar, and polo helmet and mallet. The show, which includes loans from the Hurd La Rinconada Gallery in San Patricio, N.M., and the El Paso Museum of Art, also features a video about Hurd (1904–1984).

“We’re so pleased to present the work of Peter Hurd at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum,” said Lisa Pugh, the Museum’s Chief Curator. “Through his portraits and paintings, Hurd celebrated a uniquely New Mexican way of life and depicted the inexplicable beauty of the southern high plains in a way no other artist could.”

Hurd, who was born and raised in the Roswell area, settled in southeastern New Mexico’s Hondo Valley after attending West Point, serving as a war artist correspondent during World War II, and living in Pennsylvania, where he met his wife, Henriette Wyeth. The artist is celebrated for his realistic portraits and luminous Southwestern landscapes that feature the vegetation, rolling hills, windmills, water tanks, and ever-changing skies of the area in Lincoln and Chaves counties.

Unlike many artists who are proficient in a few mediums, Hurd was skilled in a variety of media including oil, lithography, watercolor, egg tempera, and charcoal. Light was critically important in Hurd’s work and he strove to render it accurately. Hurd felt that the medium of egg tempera allowed him to truly capture the shifting light and arid landscape of New Mexico.

“If a work of art represents a particular artist’s view of the world, Peter Hurd’s work conveys how inspired he was by nature and his surroundings,” said Holly Radke, the Museum’s Collections Manager who curated the exhibit. “He is best known as a regionalist painter who captured the hardworking people and landscapes of southeastern New Mexico.”

By the time of his death in 1984, Hurd had become synonymous with New Mexico. His obituary in the New York Times was headlined, “Peter Hurd, Painter of Southwest.”

Monday–Saturday 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday, Noon–5 p.m. The barns close at 4 p.m. each day, but visitors may still walk to see the livestock until 5 p.m. Adults $5; seniors (60+) $4; children (4–17) $3; active US military and veterans $2; children 3 and under and museum members with card, free.

The New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum visitors can enjoy watching wool spinning on Tuesdays, sewing and weaving on Wednesday mornings, quilting on Thursday and Friday mornings, blacksmithing on the weekends, and milking every day.

New Mexico CulturePass

Your ticket to New Mexico's exceptional Museums and Historic Sites.
From Indian treasures to space exploration, world-class folk art to awesome dinosaurs—our museums and monuments celebrate the essence of New Mexico every day.
More Info »

Cultural Atlas of New Mexico Mobile App

Where do you belong?
The Cultural Atlas of New Mexico leads you to historic and cultural places throughout the Land of Enchantment. Organized by region, proximity and interest, the Cultural Atlas will help you find where you belong.

Get it on Google Play

Featured DCA Exhibitions

New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked
more »

The First World War

The First World War exhibition investigates the contributions of New Mexicans to the war, through letters,
more »

Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru

This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social
more »

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte!

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection
more »